New Mexico Public Regulations Commission
Case No.14-00310-UT

First posted
Thursday January 14, 2015 14:41
Updated
Wednesday February 18, 2015 17:14

Liberal arts 'educated' altenergy maintenance XOR decommissioning in focus.

Wednesday February 18, 2015 17:14

 




Radio Javan


Tuesday February 17, 2015 10:18

ALERTL39C may have been hacked from Pakistan?
 


attachment


Monday February 16, 2015 19:19



Argo music?

argo movie.

Deadly?

www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#ramiriz2




Attachment.





Deny.
Notice.


Wednesday February 11, 2015 15:07

Client software now suspected of Comcast chat virus infection. Locate virus possible?

Tuesday February 10, 2015 12:01

Hello Rebecca,

Update on LG emails.

LG apparentlyt resent and received on Lenovo G580 Windows 8 laptop running xp.



Desktop email log.




Facebook login apparently also under attack.









Please forward evidence to Kyle.

regards,
bill

Tuesday February 10, 2015 14:57



Hello Rebecca,

Talked to Kyle.

Kyle gave me some good ideas.

Logged on to Comcast server email which Kyle advised. Two LG emails missing there too.

Desktop appears to be source of problems.

Kyle asked me why anyone would want to delete emails.

Participitation in New Mexico Public Regulations Commission Case No.14-00310-UT may be reason?

Financial scam/fraud possible?

regards,
bill

zip and telephone entry works fine on xp professional laptop.



Lenovo G560 Windows 7 machine running xp zip phone number video.

Current conclusion is that desktop AMD 9950 Thunderbird virus infection.

Laptop running xp professional.




LG emails missing on desktop.

 






Monday February 9, 2015 19:24



 
What does Lester Thurow have to do about posts?

'global ecomomy. global wage'. Thurow stated.

No longer on msm TV.

Monday February 9, 2015 12:43

Hacking investigation initiated.



Video 2.





 
 




Monday February 9, 2015 10:16

Password invalidation a liberal arts' educated ploy?







Video.

Comcast account apparently hacked.



 



1.2.2.25 DISCOVERY:

F. Production of documents and things and entry upon land for inspection and other purposes: The commission, the presiding officer, staff, and parties may serve upon any party or upon staff requests for the production or inspection of documents or things within staff’s or that party’s possession, custody, or control, either consolidated with interrogatories or alone.

1.2.2.14 INFORMAL COMPLAINTS: Informal complaints are ordinarily handled by the consumer relations division through the informal complaint process outlined in this section, but from time to time, any and all commission employees or commissioners may receive complaints and inquiries from consumers and constituents and provide assistance to them consistent with their job duties and management direction. Any commission employee who receives an informal complaint should notify the consumer relations division.

 

Sunday February 8, 2015 14:56

No receipt of two documents referenced in Schwebke's Friday February 6th emails.

73 on distribution list?

Actionable?

http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#schwebke




Attachment.



Attachment.

Friday February 6, 2015 14:26
Attached is Testimony in Support of Partial Stipulation of John J. Reynolds for Case No. 14-00310-UT, filed today.



 
 

Attachment.

Friday February 6, 2015 10:41

Posting in most-recent order.

Grape 100 W polycrystalline/Quiangsun project on hold.

UT310 requires attention. 

Liberal arts 'educated' want to
CCAE will provide testimony making recommendations to change certain features of the Stipulated Pr ograms, Budgets and Savings, as summarized in Paragraph 7 of the Stipulation.



Tweet.



http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#murphyopposition



 

Statement of Opposition pdf.

Certificate of Service pdf.
Friday February 6, 2015 12:28

Liberal arts 'educated' technology.
While WRA does not oppose a hearing on the Stipulation, WRA intends to submit testimony
seeking modifications to the stipulated outcome in conformance with some or all of the issues
it has identified above.


http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#wraopposition
 
 

Attachment.

Friday February 6, 2015 12:58

http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#gould1st

 
 

Interrogatories.

Friday February 6, 2015 13:04

http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#gouldquestion

 





Friday February 6, 2015 13:54

http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#pnmmodify
 
 

Attachment.

Tuesday February 3, 2015 17:16



Shemiranant, Tehran, Iran. Too.

Cost-effective mass energy storage: DARE TO COMPARE.


 

Friday January 30, 2015 11:58



attachment pdf

Friday January 30, 2015 09:24

energyworks arrive with January bill on Thursday January 29.

649kWh for $90.66. Lots of house guests.




 


Sunday February 8, 2015 07:42

Altenergy enters maintenance OR decommissioning Visibility phases with failure of Stirling solar power engines in the Belen New Mexico city hall parking lot and New Mexico wind energy center non-producing wind turbines.

Breaking Wind: The Odd Culture of Wind Farm Protests.



Liberal arts 'educated' judge sentencing 79 year old to prison for 5 years contributes to New Mexico visibility too.


 
 
http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#murphy



Message deleted by hack into Mozilla Thunderbird.



Discovery 1 pdf.

Discovery 2 pdf.

Tuesday January 27, 2015 07:31
 
http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#noticeorder





Notice pdf.

Order pdf.


Tuesday January 20, 2015 17:48

Testimony?

Groups pull out of PNM San Juan deal.

 

Friday January 16, 2015 14:53

http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#motion

BEFORE THE NEW MEXICO PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION


IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF      )
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO )
FOR APPROVAL OF ELECTRIC ENERGY             )
EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS AND PROGRAM          )
COST TARIFF RIDER PURSUANT TO THE         )
NEW MEXICO PUBLIC UTILITY AND                  ) Case No. 14-00130-UT
EFFICIENT USE OF ENERGY ACTS,                     )
                                                                                 )
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO, )
Applicant.                                                                 )
_____________________________________)

MOTION FOR LEAVE TO INTERVENE
AND REQUEST FOR DISCOVERY


William H Payne moves under 1.2.2.23 INTERVENORS AND COMMENTERS:
A. Intervention: Any person other than staff and the original parties to a proceeding who desires to become a party to the proceeding may move in writing for leave to intervene in the proceeding.
(1) The motion for leave to intervene shall indicate the nature of the movant’s interest in the proceeding.
Identification of proceeding hijacking by unqualified participants using open mouths as opposed to fact examination.
Afterword explains.

(2) The motion shall also comply with the provisions of this rule governing pleadings except that the motion shall indicate the facts relied upon as grounds for intervention.

Hearing examiner Anthony Medeiros writes in


2. The Utility Division Staff (“Staff”) of the Commission shall, and any intervenor may, file direct testimony on or before January 23, 2015.

3. Any desired rebuttal testimony shall be filed on or before February 9, 2015.
Testimony may be an inappropriate technology employed by inappropriate people identified in Medeiros' Certificate of Service?

Data about NEW MEXICO PUBLIC UTILITY AND EFFICIENT USE OF ENERGY obtained through discovery may be appropriate technology to reach conclusion based on facts.
(3) Motions for leave to intervene shall be served on all existing parties and other proposed intervenors of record.
WHEREFORE, Grant motion to intervene with Discovery as allowed under TITLE 1 GENERAL GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATION CHAPTER 2 ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES PART 2 PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE 1.2.2.25 DISCOVERY.

Respectfully submitted this January 16, 2015.



____________________ ___________
William H Payne            date
13015 Calle de Sandias
Albuquerque, NM 87111
505-292-7037
bpayne37@comcast.net
 
Notes
Updated
Wednesday February 11, 2015 08:58

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5



6



Tweet.



7 The long-term future of the nation’s electric grid is under threat from an unlikely source—
energy-conserving Americans. ...

And if the companies raise rates too high to make up for declining sales volumes, customers will embrace even more energy-saving gizmos and solar panels, pushing down demand for grid power. The Edison Electric Institute, the trade group for investor-owned utilities, has warned that they could face a “death spiral.” ...

Since 2004, average residential electricity prices have jumped 39%, to 12.5 cents a kilowatt-hour and prices for all users have jumped 36% to 10.42 cents, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. ...

But some utilities are taking measures to counter the trend. Power companies in 20 states are trying to overhaul their rates so that they are less dependent on kilowatt-hour sales. ...

DPW Solar employee supplied.



8 MSM liberal arts 'educated' writing but relevant to energy efficiency.
No Longer so useful

The combination of distributed and intermittent generation, ever cheaper storage and increasingly intelligent consumption has created a perfect storm for utilities, particularly those in Europe, says Eduard Salade Vedruna of IHs, a consultancy. They are stuck with the costs of maintaining the grid and meeting peak demand, but without the means to make customers pay for it properly. Their expensively built generating capacity is over sized; spare~apacityInEurope this winterislooGw, 0r19% of the constituenl couuitali’ combined peak loads. Much of that is mothballed and may have to be written off. Yet at the same time new investment is urgently needed to keep the grid reliable, and especially to make sure it can cope with new kinds of power flow—from “prosumers” backto the grid, for example.

To general surprise, demand is declining as power is used more efficiently. Politicians and regulators are unsympathetic, making the utilities pay for electricity generated by other people’s assets, such as roof-top solar, to keep the greens happy. At the same time barriers to entry have collapsed. New energy companies do not need to own lots of infrastructure. Their competitive advantage rests on algorithms, sensors, processing power and good marketing—not usually the strong points of traditional utilities. All the services offered by these new entrants— demand response, supply, storage and energy efficiency—eat into the utilities’ business model.

For an illustration, look at Hawaii, where solar power has made the most inroads. On a typical sunny day, the panels on consumers’ rooftops produce so much electricity that the grid does not need to buy any power from the oil-fired generators that have long supplied the American state. But in the morning and evening those same consumers turn to the grid for extra electricity The result is a demand profile that looks like a duck’s back, rising at the tail and neck and dipping in the middle.

The problem for the state’s electricity utilities is that they still have to provide a reliable supply when the sun is not shining (it happens, even in Hawaii). But consumers, thanks to “net metering”, may have an electricity bill of zero. That means the utilities’ revenues suffer, and consumers without solar power (generally the less well-off) cross-subsidise those with it.

Rows about this are flaring across America. The Hawaiian Electric Power Company, the state’s biggest utility, is trying to restrict the further expansion of solar power, telling new consumers that they no longer have an automatic right to feed home-generated electricity into the grid. Many utilities are asking regulators to impose a fixed monthly charge on consumers, rather than just let them pay variable tariffs. Since going completely off-grid still involves buying a large amount of expensive storage, the betting is that consumers will be willing to pay a monthly fee so they can fall back on the utilities when they’need to.

Consumers, understandably, are resisting such efforts. In Arizona the utilities wanted a $50 fixed monthly charge; the regulator allowed $5. In Wisconsin they asked for $25 and got $19. Even these more modest sums may help the utilities a bit. But the bigger threat is that larger consumers (and small ones willing to join forces) can go their own way and combine generation, storage and demand response to run their own energy systems, often cal,led “microgrids”. They may maintain a single high-capacity gas or electricity connection to the outside world for safety’s sake. but still run everything downstream from that themselves.

Some organisations, such as military bases, may have specific reasons to want to be independent of outside suppliers, but for most of them the main motive is to save money The University of California, San Diego (uc SD), for example, which until 2001 had a gas plant mainly used for heating, changed to a combined- heat-and-power (cHP) plant which heats and cools 450 buildings and provides hot water for the 45,000 people who use them. The system generates 92% of the campus’s electricity and saves $8m a year. As well as 30MW from the CHP plant, the university has also installed more than 3MW in solar power and a further 3MW from a gas-powered fuel cell. When demand is low, the spare electricity cools 4m gallons (15m litres) of water for use in the air-conditioning—the biggest load on the system — or heats it to 4Oo to boost the hot-water system. Universities are ideal for such experiments. As autonomous public institutions they are exempt from fiddly local rules and from oversight by the utilities regulator. And they are interested in new ideas. Places like UCSD not only save money with their microgrids but advance research as well. A server analyses 84,000 data streams every second. A company called zan Energy has installed innovative zinc-bromide batteries; another company is trying out a 28kw supercapacitor—a storage device far faster and more powerful than any chemical battery NRG has installed a rapid charger for electric vehicles, whose past-their-prime batteries are used to provide cheap extra storage. And the university has just bought 2.5MW-worth of recyclable lithium-ion iron-phosphate battery storage from BYD, the world’s largest battery manufacturer, to flatten peaks in demand and supply further. In one sense, UC5D is not a good customer for the local utility San Diego Gas & Electric. The microgrid imports only 8% of its power from the utility But it can help out when demand elsewhere is tight, cutting its own consumption by turning down air conditioners and other power-thirsty devices and sending the spare electricity to the grid. UCSD is of scores of such microgrids pioneering new ways of using electricity efficiently and cheaply through better design, data-processing technology and changes in behaviour. The lEA reckons that this approach could cut peak demand for power in industrialised countries by 20%. That would be good for both consumers and the planet.

Energy efficiency

Invisible fuel


The biggest innovationin energy is to go without

THE CHEAPEST AND cleanest energy choice of all is not to waste it. Progress on this has been striking yet the poteiltial is still vast. Improvements in energy efficiency since the 1970S in 11 lEA member countries that keep the right kind of statistics (America, Australia, Britain, Denmark, Finland, France, Ger- many ItalyJapan, the Netherlands and Sweden) saved the equiv- alent of t4 billion tonnes of oil in 2011, worth $~‘~ billion. This saving amounted to more than their total final consumption in that year from gas, coal or any other single fuel. And lots of money is being invested in doing even better: an estimated $31o bil- lion-36o billion was put into energy efficiency measures world- wide in 2012, more than the supply-side investment is renewables or ingeneration from fossil fuels.

The “fifth fuel”, as energy efficiency is sometimes the cheapest of all. A report by ACEEE, an America ciency group, reckons that the average cost of ~av hour is 2.8 cents; the typical retail cost of on~ i# cents. In the electricity-using sector, savingt~M-bour eaa cost as little as one-sixth of a cent, says MrLoid~g~~kyMoun- tam Institute, so payback can be measured in m~i~u,not years.

The largest single chunk of final energy consumption, 31%, is in buildings, chiefly heating and cooling. Mitch of that is wast- ed, not least because in the past architects have paid little attention to details such as the design of pipework (long, narrow pipes with lots of right angles are far more wasteful than short, fat and straight ones). Energy efficiency has been nobody’s priority: it takes time and money that architects, builders, landlords and tenants would rather spend on other things.

In countries with no tradition of thrifty energy use, the skills needed are in short supply too. Even the wealthy, know- ledgeable and determined Mr Liebreich had trouble getting the builders who worked on his energy-saving house to take his in- structions seriously Painstakingly taping the joins in insulating boards, and the gaps around them, seems unnecessary unless you understand the physics behind it: it is plugging the last few leaks that brings the biggest benefits. Builders are trained to wor- ry about adequate ventilation, but not many know about the marvels of heat exchangers set in chimney stacks.

Snug as a bug in a rug

For new buildings, though, energy efficiency is becoming an important factor. The 99-Storey Pertamina Energy Tower be- ing built in Jakarta, for example, will be so thrifty that wind, solar and geothermal energy can meet all its power needs. “Energy- plus” buildings can even harvest energy from their environment and inhabitants and export it. Like cars, new buildings are typi- cally much more efficient than the ones they replace.

But old cars are scrapped more often than old houses. The biggest problem in energy efficiency is adapting existing buildings. Circle Housing, a large British housing association, has 65,000 dwellings, with tenants whose incomes are typically be- low £20,000 ($32,000) a year, low by British standards. Annual energy bills in the worst properties can be a whopping £2,000, so Circle is knocking some of the houses down. Their replacements bring the bills down to about £450. In new “passive houses”,

built from mass-produced prefabricated energy-efficient components at roughly the same cost as ordinary ones, bills fall to £350. The inhabitants have to get used to not opening windows, which wastes heat and upsets the ventilation system. But Europe already has 30,000 such buildings, and more are on the way

For Circle’s existing stock, with bills averaging £1,240 a year, “energy champions”—tenants who are trained ‘to help others with similar housing and lifestyles—offer simple tips (switching off appliances,turning down thermostats) that save an average of £250 a year. Helping tenants shop around for good deals on gas and electricitysaves another £15o. But after that it gets much more expensive. Refitting a house with double glazing, cavity-wall and loft insulation, a heat pump and an energy-efficient boiler may save another £150, but requires an investment of £3,000 to £8,000. In most houses and offices, saving £3 a week is not worth a lot of hassle. Tenants do not want to invest in properties they do not own, and landlords do not really care how much their tenants pay for their energy. Besides, better insulation may simply mean that people wear lighter clothes indoors rather than turn the heating down.

One answer to this market failure is to bring in mandatory standards for landlords and those selling properties. Another involves energy-service companies, known as ESCOs, which guarantee lower bills in exchange for modernisation. The company can develop economies of scale and tap financialmarkets for the upfront costs. The savings are shared with owners and occupiers. ESCOs are already a $6.5 billion-a-year industry in America and a $12 billion one in China. Both are dwarfed by Europe, with Euro 41 billion ($56 billion) last year. Navigant Research, the consultancy, expects this to double by 2023.

That highlights one of the biggest reasons for optimism about the future of energy. Capital markets, frozen into caution after the financial crash of 2008, are now doing again what they are supposed to do: financing investments on the basis of future revenues. The growth of a bond market to pay for energy-eficiency projects was an encouraging sign in 2014, when $30 bilion-40 billion were issued; this year’s total is likely to be $100 billion.

Solar energy is now a predictable income stream drawing in serious money A rooftop lease can finance an investment of $15,000-20,000 with monthly payments that are lower than the customer’s current utility bill. SolarCity an American company rias financed $5 billion in new solar capacity raising money initally from institutional investors, including Goldman Sachs and Google, but now from individual private investors—who also become what the company calls “brand ambassadors”, encouragng friends and colleagues to install solar panels too.

The model is simple: SolarCity pays for the installation, then bund1es the revenues and sells a bond based on the expected future income stream. Maturities range from one to seven years. The upshot is that the cost of capital for the solar industryis 200-300 basis points lower than that for utilities.

A virtuous circle is emerging which is confounding the doomsters. It rests on five elements. The first is abundant energy above all from new solar technology: a sliver now, but also a dagger in the heart of the fossil-fuel industry. The grid parity which Hawaiian rooftops offer today will be possible in many more locations in future— and not just on rooftops in direct sunlight, but from any surface in daytime. That shapes the future investment climate.
The price of fossil fuels will always fluctuate. Solar is bound to get cheaper.
[How much electricity is required to build, distribute, and install a solar panel? EROEI]

The second part of the circle is storage. Batteries are getting cheaper, more powerful and more prevalent,
Depending on its size, a pumped-hydro plant can deliver power for tens of hours at a cost of about $100 per kilowatt-hour. Grid-level batteries can cost 10 times that, which is why there are just a few hundred megawatts of battery power on the grid—less than the amount contributed by one full-size power plant. 

for example in electric cars. So, too, are other ways of storing energy such as warm water and ice. That deals with the biggest disadvantage of solar power, its intermittent [Erratic] nature. Some of this may be achieved through big interconnectors that can shift power to countries with the right geography for hydro-electric generation. But even more important may be the aggregation of lots of small-scale storage. That reflects the third element: distribution. Consumers are now in a position to be small producers and storers of energy That creates resilience in the network, along with greater efficiency and more innovation. Perhaps fuel cells will become smaller and cheaper, making up a network of micropower stations wherever the gas pipelines run. Perhaps they will remain toys for the rich. But whereas innovation in the power network of the past - big, centralised and regulated — was slow, in the new, decentralised grid of the future it will move ever faster.

The fourth part of the circle is intelligence. The internet has made it possible for its users to generate, store and manage data efficiently. Now processing power and algorithms will do the same for electricity Whether that comes from smart meters which manage consumption in the home or from individual smart devices programmed to maximise their efficiency remains to be seen. Given the risk of cyber-attacks, security will need serious thought. But overall the grid is getting smarter, not dumber.

The fifth and final part is finance. Business models for new energy systems are now proven, both in the rich world and in emerging economies. A wave of money is breaking over the old model, sweeping away incumbents. If they and their friends in government try to hold it back, everyone will suffer.

The Economist
January 17th - 23rd 2015

9 Images for household use of electricity.



Find shower or faucet aerator? Or find the liberal arts 'educated' at work?

10??

Friday January 16, 2015 14:49

http://www.prosefights.org/irp2014/ut310.htm#servicecertificate

BEFORE THE NEW MEXICO PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION


IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF      )
UBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO )
FOR APPROVAL OF ELECTRIC ENERGY             )
EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS AND PROGRAM          )
COST TARIFF RIDER PURSUANT TO THE         )
NEW MEXICO PUBLIC UTILITY AND                  ) Case No. 14-00130-UT
EFFICIENT USE OF ENERGY ACTS,                     )
                                                                                 )
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO, )
Applicant.                                                                 )
_____________________________________)
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE


I hereby certify that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Procedural Order was emailed to those persons at the email addresses shown below:

Benjamin Phillips, Esq.
PNM Resources, Inc.
Corporate Offices - Legal Albuquerque,
NM 87158-0805
Ben.Phillips@pnmresources.com

David Tourek, Esq.
City of Albuquerque
PO Box 2248 Albuquerque, NM 87103
dtourek@cabq.Gov

Steven Schwebke PNM Resources, Inc.
Corporate Offices - Regulatory Albuquerque,
NM 87158-0805
Steven.Schwebke@pnm.com

Daniel A. Najjar, Esq.
Virtue, Najjar & Brown, P.C.
PO Box 22249
Santa Fe, NM 87502-2249
vnajjar@aol.com

James R. Dittmer Utilitech, Inc.
623 NE St. Andrews
Circle Lee’s Summit, MO 64064
j_dittmer@utilitech.net

Cholla Khoury, Esq.
Assistant Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
PO Drawer 1508 Santa Fe, NM 87504-1508
Ckhoury@nmag.gov
lmartinez@nmag.gov

Jeffrey L. Fornaciari, Esq.
Hinkle Law Firm
PO Box 2068
Santa Fe, NM 87504-2068
Jfornaciari@hinklelawfirm.com

Randall W. Childress, Esq.
Stacey J. Goodwin Esq.
Law Offices of Randall W. Childress, P.C.
300 Galisteo Street, Suite 205
Santa Fe, NM 87501
randy@childresslaw.com
stacey@childresslaw.com

Michael L. Kurtz, Esq.
Kurt J. Boehm, Esq. Boehm,
Kurtz & Lowry
36 East Seventh Street, Suite 1510
Cincinnati, OH 45202
mkurtz@bkllawfirm.com
KBoehm@bkllawfirm.com

Peter J. Gould, Esq.
PO Box 34127
Santa Fe, NM 87594-4127
pgouldlaw@gmail.com

Patrick J. Griebel, Esq.
Albuquerque Business Law, P.C.
1803 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, Suite B
Albuquerque, NM 87104
Patrick@abqbizlaw.com

Nann M. Winter, Esq.
Stelzner, Winter, Warburton, Sanchez & Dawes, P.A.
P. O. Box 528
Albuquerque, NM 87103-0528
nwinter@stelznerlaw.com

Jami Porter Lara
Prosperity Works
909 Copper NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
jporterlara@gmail.com

Kelley Brennan, Esq.
Marcos D. Martinez
City of Santa Fe
PO Box 909 Santa Fe, NM
87504-0909
kabrennan@santafenm.gov
mdmartinez@santafenm.gov

Jeffrey H. Albright, Esq.
Lewis Roca Rothgerber, LLP 201
Third Street, NW, Suite
1950 Albuquerque, NM 87102
jalbright@lrlaw.com

Justin Lesky, Esq.
Law Office of Justin Lesky
8210 La Mirada Place NE, Suite 600
Albuquerque, NM 87109
jlesky@leskylawoffice.com

Thomas Singer
464 Camino Don Miguel
Santa Fe, NM 87505
Singer@westernlaw.org

William P. Templeman, Esq.
Comeau, Maldegen, Templeman & Indall, LLP
PO Box 669 Santa Fe, NM 87504-0669
wtempleman@cmtisantafe.com

Michael Dirmeier
Georgetown Consulting Group
1902 Overlook Ridge Drive
Keller, TX 76248
mdirmeie@gsb.uchicago.edu

Richard Mertz, Esq.
Kimberly Bell, Esq.
University of New Mexico
MS C05 3310 1
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87121-0001
rmertz@salud.unm.edu
KiBell@salud.unm.edu

Gregory Shaffer
Santa Fe County Attorney
201 Grant Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87504-0276
rgurule@santafecountynm.gov

Gregory K. Lawrence, Esq.
McDermott Will & Emery LLP
28 State Street
Boston, MA 02109-1775
glawrence@mwe.com

Michael McElrath,
Director Energy Management Freeport - McMoRan Mining
One North Central Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85004
Michael McElrath@FMI.com

Andrea Crane
James Cotton
The Columbia Group
PO Box 810
Georgetown, CT 06829
ctcolumbia@aol.com

Mark Fenton,
Director Regulatory Policy and Case Management PNM Resources, Inc
Corporate Offices - Regulatory
Albuquerque, NM 87158-1105
Mark.Fenton@pnm.com

Lt. Col. Gregory
Fike Air Force Utility Litigation Team
139 Barnes Drive, Suite 1
Tyndall AFB, FL 32403
Gregory.Fike@tyndall.af.mil

Lewis Campbell, Esq.
Keres Consulting, Inc.
P.O. Box 51508
Albuquerque, NM 87181-1508
lcampbe!14@comcast.net

Sunny Nixon, Esq.
Rodey, Dickason, Sloan, Akin & Robb
P.O. Box 1357
Santa Fe, NM 87504-1357
SNixon@rodey.com

Thomas W. Olson, Esq.
Montgomery & Andrews, P.A.
PO Box 2307
Santa Fe, NM 87504-2307
tolson@montand.com

Ken Reif, Esq.
Tri-State Generation & Transmission Assoc., Inc.
PO Box 33695
Denver, CO 80232-0695
kreif@tristatetgt.org

Bradford Borman, Esq.
PNM Resources, Inc.
Corporate Headquarters - Legal
Albuquerque, NM 87158-0805
Bradford.Borman@pnmresources.com

Steven S. Michel, Esq.
227 E. Palace Ave., Suite M
Santa Fe, NM 87501
smichel@westernresources.org

Patrick T. Ortiz, Esq.
Cuddy & McCarthy, LLP
PO Box 4160
Santa Fe, NM 87502-4160
POrtiz@cuddymccarthy.com

Bruce C. Throne, Esq.
1440-B South
Saint Francis Dr. Santa Fe, NM 87505-4097
bthroneatty@newmexicocorn

Steven C. Gross, Esq.
Porter Simon, PC
40200 Truckee Airport Road
Truckee, CA 96161
gross@portersimon.com

Keven Groenewold
NM Rural Electric Cooperative
614 Don Gaspar Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87505-4428
kgroenewold@nmelectric.coop

Kenneth Anderson
Tri-State Generation & Transmission Assoc., Inc.
PO Box 33695
Denver, CO 80232-0695
kanderson@tristategt.org

Carroll Waggoner
Otero County Cooperative
PO Box 227
Cloudcroft, NM 88317
carro!lw@ote-coop.com

Jay Kumar
Economic & Technology Consultants
6241 Executive Blvd.
Rockville, MD 80852
jkumar@etcinc.biz

Matthew Kahal
Exeter Associates, Inc.
5565 Sterrett P1.
Columbia, MD 21044
mkahal@exeterassociates.com

Thomas Domme,
AC 02 New Mexico Gas Company
P. O. Box 97500
Albuquerque, NM 87199-7500
Thomas.domme@nmgco.com

Mona Tierney-Lloyd
Sr. Manager,
Western Regulatory Affairs EnerNOC, Inc.
P. O. Box 378 Cayucos, CA 93439
Mtierney-lloyd@enernoc.com

Ed Reyes
Comverge, Inc.
3271 Candelaria NE
Albuquerque, NM 87107-1804
ereyes@comverge.com

Charles F. Noble, Esq.
CCAE 409 E. Palace Avenue, Unit 2
Santa Fe, NM 87501
c-m-k@msn.com

Nancy Burns, Esq.
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, NM 87504
Nancy.Burns@state.nm.us

John Reynolds
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504
John.Reynolds@state.nm.us

John C. Tysseling
Energy Economic & Envir. Consultants
5600 Eubank, NE - Suite 200
Albuquerque, NM 87111
jct@e3c.com

Evan Evans
Southwestern Public Service Company
PO Box 1261 Amarillo, TX 79170
evan.evans@xcelenergy.com

Anastasia S. Stevens
Keleher & McLeod, P.A.
P. O. Box AA Albuquerque, NM 87103
ast@keleher-law.com

Joanne Reuter
Reuter Legal & Consulting Services
12231 Academy Rd. NE,
PMB 301-191
Albuquerque, NM 87111
joannecreuter@comcast.net

Howard Geller
2334 North Broadway,
Suite A
Boulder, CO 80304
hgeller@swenergy.org

Kira Jones
Community Action New Mexico
400 Central SE, # 101
Albuquerque, NM 87102-3467
kira@communityactionnewmexico.org

Charles Gunter
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504
Charles.Gunter@state.nm.us


Bruno Carrara New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta Santa Fe,
New Mexico 87504
Bruno.Carrara@state.nm.us

Anthony Sisneros
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, NM 87504
Anthony.Sisneros@state.nm.us

Judith Amer
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504
Judith.Amer@state.nm.us

Tammy Fiebelkorn
tfiebelkorn@swenergy.com

Natisha Demko
ndemko@nrdc.org

Glenda Murphy
gmurphy@wessternresources.org

Don Hancock
sricdon@earthlink.net
Frank Lacey
flacey@comverge.com

Tracy Caswell
tcaswell@co_mverge.com

Sanders Moore
sanders@environmentnewmexico.org

Stephen Fischmann
Stephen.fischmann@gmail.com

Doug Gegax
DGegax@nmsu.edu

Ken Baker
Ken.baker@wa!-mart.com

Jeffrey Haas
jeffhaas@aol.com

Friday January 16 2015.

William H Payne          
13015 Calle de Sandias
Albuquerque, NM 87111
505-292-7037
bpayne37@comcast.net



Ken.baker@wa!-mart.com INVALID


Ben.Phillips@pnmresources.com
dtourek@cabq.Gov
Steven.Schwebke@pnm.com
vnajjar@aol.com
j_dittmer@utilitech.net
Ckhoury@nmag.gov
lmartinez@nmag.gov
Jfornaciari@hinklelawfirm.com
randy@childresslaw.com
stacey@childresslaw.com

mkurtz@bkllawfirm.com
KBoehm@bkllawfirm.com
pgouldlaw@gmail.com
Patrick@abqbizlaw.com
nwinter@stelznerlaw.com
jporterlara@gmail.com
kabrennan@santafenm.gov
mdmartinez@santafenm.gov
jalbright@lrlaw.com
jlesky@leskylawoffice.com

Singer@westernlaw.org
wtempleman@cmtisantafe.com
mdirmeie@gsb.uchicago.edu
rmertz@salud.unm.edu
KiBell@salud.unm.edu
rgurule@santafecountynm.gov
glawrence@mwe.com
Michael McElrath@FMI.com
ctcolumbia@aol.com
Mark.Fenton@pnm.com

Gregory.Fike@tyndall.af.mil
lcampbe!14@comcast.net
SNixon@rodey.com
tolson@montand.com
kreif@tristatetgt.org
Bradford.Borman@pnmresources.com
smichel@westernresources.org
POrtiz@cuddymccarthy.com
bthroneatty@newmexico.com
gross@portersimon.com
kgroenewold@nmelectric.coop

kanderson@tristategt.org
carro!lw@ote-coop.com
jkumar@etcinc.biz
mkahal@exeterassociates.com
Thomas.domme@nmgco.com
Mtierney-lloyd@enernoc.com
ereyes@comverge.com
c-m-k@msn.com
Nancy.Burns@state.nm.us
John.Reynolds@state.nm.us

jct@e3c.com
evan.evans@xcelenergy.com
ast@keleher-law.com
joannecreuter@comcast.net
hgeller@swenergy.org
kira@communityactionnewmexico.org
Charles.Gunter@state.nm.us
Bruno.Carrara@state.nm.us
Anthony.Sisneros@state.nm.us
Judith.Amer@state.nm.us
tfiebelkorn@swenergy.com

ndemko@nrdc.org
gmurphy@westernresources.org
flacey@comverge.com
tcaswell@co_mverge.com
sanders@environmentnewmexico.org
Stephen.fischmann@gmail.com
DGegax@nmsu.edu

jeffhaas@aol.com


Thursday January 14, 2015 15:15


2.The Utility Division Staff (“Staff”) of the Commission shall, and any intervenor may, file direct testimony on or before January 23, 2015.

3. Any desired rebuttal testimony shall be filed on or before February 9, 2015.


Friday January 16, 2015 10:09

Testimony? Inappropriate technology?
 






pdf allowed cut and paste. :)

BEFORE THE NEW MEXICO PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO
FOR APPROVAL OF ELECTRIC ENERGY
EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS AND PROGRAM
COST TARIFF RIDER PURSUANT TO THE
NEW MEXICO PUBLIC UTILITY AND
EFFICIENT USE OF ENERGY ACTS

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO,
Applicant. ))))) ))))))) Case No. 14-00310-UT

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE

I hereby certify that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Procedural Order was mailed first-class, postage-paid or hand-delivered to the each of the following persons whose mailing addresses are listed below and emailed to those persons at the email addresses shown below:

Benjamin Phillips, Esq.
PNM Resources, Inc.
Corporate Offices - Legal Albuquerque,
NM 87158-0805
Ben.Phillips@pnmresources.com

David Tourek, Esq.
City of Albuquerque
PO Box 2248 Albuquerque, NM 87103
dtourek@cabq.Gov

Steven Schwebke PNM Resources, Inc.
Corporate Offices - Regulatory Albuquerque,
NM 87158-0805
Steven.Schwebke@pnm.com

Daniel A. Najjar, Esq.
Virtue, Najjar & Brown, P.C.
PO Box 22249
Santa Fe, NM 87502-2249
vnajjar@aol.com

James R. Dittmer Utilitech, Inc.
623 NE St. Andrews
Circle Lee’s Summit, MO 64064
j_dittmer@utilitech.net

Cholla Khoury, Esq.
Assistant Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
PO Drawer 1508 Santa Fe, NM 87504-1508
Ckhoury@nmag.gov
lmartinez@nmag.gov

Jeffrey L. Fornaciari, Esq.
Hinkle Law Firm
PO Box 2068
Santa Fe, NM 87504-2068
Jfornaciari@hinklelawfirm.com

Randall W. Childress, Esq.
Stacey J. Goodwin Esq.
Law Offices of Randall W. Childress, P.C.
300 Galisteo Street, Suite 205
Santa Fe, NM 87501
randy@childresslaw.com
stacey@childresslaw.com

Michael L. Kurtz, Esq.
Kurt J. Boehm, Esq. Boehm,
Kurtz & Lowry
36 East Seventh Street, Suite 1510
Cincinnati, OH 45202
mkurtz@bkllawfirm.com
KBoehm@bkllawfirm.com

Peter J. Gould, Esq.
PO Box 34127
Santa Fe, NM 87594-4127
pgouldlaw@gmail.com

Patrick J. Griebel, Esq.
Albuquerque Business Law, P.C.
1803 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, Suite B
Albuquerque, NM 87104
Patrick@abqbizlaw.com

Nann M. Winter, Esq.
Stelzner, Winter, Warburton, Sanchez & Dawes, P.A.
P. O. Box 528
Albuquerque, NM 87103-0528
nwinter@stelznerlaw.com

Jami Porter Lara
Prosperity Works
909 Copper NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
jporterlara@gmail.com

Kelley Brennan, Esq.
Marcos D. Martinez
City of Santa Fe
PO Box 909 Santa Fe, NM
87504-0909
kabrennan@santafenm.gov
mdmartinez@santafenm.gov

Jeffrey H. Albright, Esq.
Lewis Roca Rothgerber, LLP 201
Third Street, NW, Suite
1950 Albuquerque, NM 87102
jalbright@lrlaw.com

Justin Lesky, Esq.
Law Office of Justin Lesky
8210 La Mirada Place NE, Suite 600
Albuquerque, NM 87109
jlesky@leskylawoffice.com

Thomas Singer
464 Camino Don Miguel
Santa Fe, NM 87505
Singer@westernlaw.org

William P. Templeman, Esq.
Comeau, Maldegen, Templeman & Indall, LLP
PO Box 669 Santa Fe, NM 87504-0669
wtempleman@cmtisantafe.com

Michael Dirmeier
Georgetown Consulting Group
1902 Overlook Ridge Drive
Keller, TX 76248
mdirmeie@gsb.uchicago.edu

Richard Mertz, Esq.
Kimberly Bell, Esq.
University of New Mexico
MS C05 3310 1
University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87121-0001
rmertz@salud.unm.edu
KiBell@salud.unm.edu

Gregory Shaffer
Santa Fe County Attorney
201 Grant Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87504-0276
rgurule@santafecountynm.gov

Gregory K. Lawrence, Esq.
McDermott Will & Emery LLP
28 State Street
Boston, MA 02109-1775
glawrence@mwe.com

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE Page 2 NMPRC Case No. 14-00310-UT

Michael McElrath,
Director Energy Management Freeport - McMoRan Mining
One North Central Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85004
Michael McElrath@FMI.com

Andrea Crane
James Cotton
The Columbia Group
PO Box 810
Georgetown, CT 06829
ctcolumbia@aol.com

Mark Fenton,
Director Regulatory Policy and Case Management PNM Resources, Inc
Corporate Offices - Regulatory
Albuquerque, NM 87158-1105
Mark.Fenton@pnm.com

Lt. Col. Gregory
Fike Air Force Utility Litigation Team
139 Barnes Drive, Suite 1
Tyndall AFB, FL 32403
Gregory.Fike@tyndall.af.mil

Lewis Campbell, Esq.
Keres Consulting, Inc.
P.O. Box 51508
Albuquerque, NM 87181-1508
lcampbe!14@comcast.net

Sunny Nixon, Esq.
Rodey, Dickason, Sloan, Akin & Robb
P.O. Box 1357
Santa Fe, NM 87504-1357
SNixon@rodey.com

Thomas W. Olson, Esq.
Montgomery & Andrews, P.A.
PO Box 2307
Santa Fe, NM 87504-2307
tolson@montand.com

Ken Reif, Esq.
Tri-State Generation & Transmission Assoc., Inc.
PO Box 33695
Denver, CO 80232-0695
kreif@tristatetgt.org

Bradford Borman, Esq.
PNM Resources, Inc.
Corporate Headquarters - Legal
Albuquerque, NM 87158-0805
Bradford.Borman@pnmresources.com

Steven S. Michel, Esq.
227 E. Palace Ave., Suite M
Santa Fe, NM 87501
smichel@westernresources.org

Patrick T. Ortiz, Esq.
Cuddy & McCarthy, LLP
PO Box 4160
Santa Fe, NM 87502-4160
POrtiz@cuddymccarthy.com

Bruce C. Throne, Esq.
1440-B South
Saint Francis Dr. Santa Fe, NM 87505-4097
bthroneatty@newmexicocorn

Steven C. Gross, Esq.
Porter Simon, PC
40200 Truckee Airport Road
Truckee, CA 96161
gross@portersimon.com

Keven Groenewold
NM Rural Electric Cooperative
614 Don Gaspar Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87505-4428
kgroenewold@nmelectric.coop

Kenneth Anderson
Tri-State Generation & Transmission Assoc., Inc.
PO Box 33695
Denver, CO 80232-0695
kanderson@tristategt.org

Carroll Waggoner
Otero County Cooperative
PO Box 227
Cloudcroft, NM 88317
carro!lw@ote-coop.com

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE NMPRC Case No. 14-00310-UT Page 3

Jay Kumar
Economic & Technology Consultants
6241 Executive Blvd.
Rockville, MD 80852
jkumar@etcinc.biz

Matthew Kahal
Exeter Associates, Inc.
5565 Sterrett P1.
Columbia, MD 21044
mkahal@exeterassociates.com

Thomas Domme,
AC 02 New Mexico Gas Company
P. O. Box 97500
Albuquerque, NM 87199-7500
Thomas.domme@nmgco.com

Mona Tierney-Lloyd
Sr. Manager,
Western Regulatory Affairs EnerNOC, Inc.
P. O. Box 378 Cayucos, CA 93439
Mtierney-lloyd@enernoc.com

Ed Reyes
Comverge, Inc.
3271 Candelaria NE
Albuquerque, NM 87107-1804
ereyes@comverge.com

Charles F. Noble, Esq.
CCAE 409 E. Palace Avenue, Unit 2
Santa Fe, NM 87501
c-m-k@msn.com

HAND DELIVERED:

Nancy Burns, Esq.
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, NM 87504
Nancy.Burns@state.nm.us

HAND DELIVERED:

John Reynolds
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504
John.Reynolds@state.nm.us

John C.
Tysseling Energy Economic & Envir. Consultants
5600 Eubank, NE - Suite 200
Albuquerque, NM 87111
jct@e3c.com

Evan Evans
Southwestern Public Service Company
PO Box 1261 Amarillo, TX 79170
evan.evans@xcelenergy.com

Anastasia S. Stevens
Keleher & McLeod, P.A.
P. O. Box AA Albuquerque, NM 87103
ast@keleher-law.com

Joanne Reuter
Reuter Legal & Consulting Services
12231 Academy Rd. NE,
PMB 301-191
Albuquerque, NM 87111
joannecreuter@comcast.net

Howard Geller
2334 North Broadway,
Suite A
Boulder, CO 80304
hgeller@swenergy.org

Kira Jones
Community Action New Mexico
400 Central SE, # 101
Albuquerque, NM 87102-3467
kira@communityactionnewmexico.org

HAND DELIVERED:

Charles Gunter
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504
Charles.Gunter@state.nm.us

HAND DELIVERED:
Bruno Carrara New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta Santa Fe,
New Mexico 87504
Bruno.Carrara@state.nm.us
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE NMPRC Case No. 14-00310-UT Page 4 HAND DELIVERED:

Anthony Sisneros
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, NM 87504
Anthony.Sisneros@state.nm.us

HAND DELIVERED:

Judith Amer
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
1120 Paseo de Peralta
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504
Judith.Amer@state.nm.us

Email only:

Tammy Fiebelkorn
tfiebelkorn@swenergy.com

Natisha Demko
ndemko@nrdc.org

Glenda Murphy
gmurphy@wessternresources.org

Don Hancock
sricdon@earthlink.net
Frank Lacey
flacey@comverge.com

Tracy Caswell
tcaswell@co_mverge.com

Sanders Moore
sanders@environmentnewmexico.org

Stephen Fischmann Stephen.fischmann@gmail.com

Doug Gegax
DGegax@nmsu.edu

Ken Baker
Ken.baker@wa!-mart.com

Jeffrey Haas jeffhaas@aol.com

DATED this 24th day of November 2014. NEW MEXICO PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION
Anthony F. Medeiros
Hearing Examiner

Service list?

Friday January 16, 2015 09:15





Feds don't like these messes. Punishment?



Apple’s New Programming Language Is Growing Like Mad.















Siavash Ghomayshi "TEHRAN".

Bill Payne. From Bismarck, ND. Facebook site hacked. Suspect identified. :)



Setareh = Star.







Wednesday January 14, 2015 17:06











11 Interviews You May have Missed in 2014.



The End of the Industrial Revolution.
 

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